The family of a Colorado Springs swimmer with diabetes has filed a complaint against the Colorado High School Activities Association (CHSAA) after the organization wouldn't let him swim in a competition due to his glucose monitor.

According to Denver7, the event in question was a relay race in the state championships. Coronado High School's Ethan Orr, 16, decided not to compete in the event after a referee said he couldn't swim while wearing his glucose monitor — a device he needs to determine his body's blood sugar — if he didn't have a doctor's note.

Unfortunately, Orr's family says his decision meant the entire team couldn't participate in the race.

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Orr's mother, Amanda Terrell-Orr, told the station that her son's glucose monitor has never been a problem before this, even without a doctor's note.

"The rule does not apply to the situation. He wasn't wearing a foreign substance or device to aid in his speed, buoyancy or body compression," she said to Denver7. "It basically slows him down and puts him at a disadvantage compared to other swimmers, but that's not something he's requested an accommodation for. He simply wants to have an equity."

After requesting to discuss the incident and receiving no response from CHSAA, the family contacted the Colorado Law Team to file a federal discrimination complaint against the organization, in the hopes that CHSAA would change their policies — or, at the very least, clarify them.

The family is not currently filing a lawsuit, although Terrell-Orr said she might pursue one if action isn't taken.

When asked for comment by Denver7, CHSSA noted that they are reviewing the complaint and that, per the National Federation of High Schools' rules, Orr did need a doctor's note to compete with his glucose monitor.

The organization also refuted claims that Orr's team was disqualified due to his glucose monitor, stating that the team did compete and was later disqualified for an unrelated reason.

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