You may have noticed that some houses around Colorado have different colored lights illuminating their porches at night, but have you ever wondered if there was a special meaning behind it?

As it turns out, different colors of porch lights are known to carry various different meanings.

Colored Porch Lights in Colorado: Support for Causes

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One of the topics that porch lights are known to signify is support for a cause. For example, a purple porch light can signify support for victims of domestic violence, a blue porch light can be a sign of support for autism awareness, and a pink porch light is often used to support breast cancer awareness.

Colored Porch Lights in Colorado: Support for Groups

Colored porch lights can also be a sign of support for a group of people. For example, a blue porch light can be used as a sign of support for police, a green porch light can be used as a sign of support for veterans, and a red light can mean that the homeowners are supportive of firefighters.

Colored Porch Lights in Colorado: Celebrating Holidays

Sometimes a colored porch light might just mean that the homeowner is in a festive mood. For example, black and/or orange porchlights can be often found on display during Halloween, a green porch light can be found during St. Patrick's Day or Christmas, and a red porch light is often seen displayed around Valentine's Day or Christmas as well.

Keep scrolling to check out all of the numerous meanings tied to colored porch lights you might see in Colorado:

 

 

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